San Jacinto Monument

San Jacinto Monument

The monument is named with respect to the Battle of Jacinto. The piece of land where it occurred deserved a lot of respect. This prompted Texas Veterans Association to plan for a formal monument. In the 1890s, the state received funds to purchase the then privately owned land. The design of the San Jacinto monument is the creativity of architects Alfred C. Finn, Jesse H. Jones, and Robert J. Cummins. Warren S. Bellows Construction of Houston and Dallas was the construction firm. Construction of the monument started in 1936 and finished in 1939. Since it opened its doors, the San Jacinto Museum of History tells the whole story in great detail. A two hundred twenty-ton star built from concrete, steel, and stone is the monument’s crowning jewel.

Want to get out of Houston? Check out the world’s tallest war memorial! 

The San Jacinto Monument is fifteen feet higher than the Washington monument. It honors all the brave people who fought to win Texas’s independence. 

History

The monument is named with respect to the Battle of Jacinto. The piece of land where it occurred deserved a lot of respect. This prompted Texas Veterans Association to plan for a formal monument. In the 1890s, the state received funds to purchase the then privately owned land. The design of the San Jacinto monument is the creativity of architects Alfred C. Finn, Jesse H. Jones, and Robert J. Cummins. Warren S. Bellows Construction of Houston and Dallas was the construction firm. Construction of the monument started in 1936 and finished in 1939. Since it opened its doors, the San Jacinto Museum of History tells the whole story in great detail. A two hundred twenty-ton star built from concrete, steel, and stone is the monument’s crowning jewel. 

Dimensions

Standing proudly at 570 feet, this is a fine example of Art Deco architecture. In fact, it was recognized as a historic civil engineering landmark. The base of the monument is 125 square feet (ca. 12 m²) with text paneling to highlight the important events that led up to the Texas Revolution. The shaft has an octagonal shape and measures 48 feet at the base. 

Visitor information

Visitors will find the museum at the base of the monument. They are flanked by a set of bronze doors that are emblazoned with the Texas six flags. The observation deck is located thirty feet above the base. Apart from the monument, there are hiking trails, battle reenactments, and some of the best birding. 

Location

The San Jacinto monument is located in Harris County, only 20 minutes away from downtown Houston. 

Learn more on the San Jacinto website.